Pizza Dough Weight Chart: The Ultimate Cheatsheet by Pizza Style

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Scale Up Your Pizza Game with a Pizza Dough Weight Chart

Yes, it is time you start weighing your pizza dough balls because size does matter. By knowing your pizza dough weight according to your desired pizza size you will be able to make very consistent pizzas.

Every time you will have the same results, at least in terms of size.

So grab a scale, and let’s start by measuring both your ingredients and your pizza doughball weight portions. You’ll be sure to impress your friends and family with your pizza-making skills. Let’s start!

Why Weigh the Ingredients?

Especially with dry ingredients like wheat flour that can be fluffy or compacted (thus varying in volume), measuring by flour weight helps to ensure that your dough preparation is consistent.

This process is beneficial when cooking for guests – you want to know how your crust will behave and taste. Entertaining and experimentation generally do not mix!

If you plan to make pizza and other baked goods routinely, a scale is a wise investment. Get a scale that will show your dough weight in both ounces and grams.

We like to use grams as our unit of measure because it is easier to weigh small amounts of ingredients (like salt) in grams and do the scaling math (which we’ll talk about later).

Also, portioning out dough by weight helps to make crust size consistent from pie to pie and day to day.

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Pro Tip


Before measuring wheat flour, it’s best to stir it a bit because it settles in the container.

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What is Baker’s Percentage, and Why Should I Use it?

The baker’s percentage (also known as baker’s math) is a means of stating a pizza dough recipe as the weight of each ingredient relative to the flour’s weight.

It is standard practice in commercial bakeries to ensure consistency and is useful when scaling a recipe up or down to make different batch sizes.

This method has advantages when it comes time to adapt a recipe to prepare a specific amount of dough; you can calculate precisely how many grams of each ingredient you need without guessing and potentially missing the mark.

In addition to the flour, you can with the sauce and the cheese.

Just place a large bowl on the scale and press the “Tare” button to bring it to “0” then add the ingredients up to the desired weight.

Also, suppose you want to start experimenting and developing your pizza dough recipe. In that case, you can record the relative amounts of water, salt, or sugar (for example), adjust the amounts of these ingredients, and compare the results.

Why do we use grams as a measure of pizza dough weight?

The main reason why we use grams is that when making pizza at home we handle little amounts of ingredients; with grams, these ingredients are easier to scale.

Grams are easier to scale than any other unit of measurement. Why? 

No fractions!  All-round numbers, no need to round up or down. 

Check this out, wouldn’t it be easier to read and weigh out 530 grams of bread flour on a scale than “1 pound, 2.695 ounces”? or isn’t easier to add 10 grams of yeast rather than .352 ounces?  

Also, keep in mind most home baking scales can’t register decimals or fractions.

 Pounds and ounces are a thing in the US. The rest of the world uses the metric system. 

If you would like to learn more about the baker’s percentage method, check our article Are you still measuring in cups? Here is How to Achieve Consistency.

How to Convert a Recipe to Baker’s Percentage

To show you how it is calculated, we will convert our standard pizza dough recipe into Baker’s Percentage.  Here is our standard recipe if you would like to learn more about it.

Pro homemade pizza recipe

The Best Homemade Pizza Recipe that Will Make You a PRO!

Proportions of Our Pro Homemade Pizza Dough Recipe

Our Pro Homemade Pizza Recipe calls for the following ingredients:

  • 500g High Protein Flour or Bread Flour
  • 325g Water
  • 5g Active Dry Yeast
  • 10g Salt
  • 25g Olive Oil
  • 20g Honey or Sugar

To convert this recipe into baker’s percentages, each ingredient’s weight is expressed as a percentage of the flour’s weight.

So, we divide the grams of each ingredient by the grams of flour (500) and multiply by 100 to get the percent:

  • 500g Flour – 500g/500g=100%
  • 325g Water – 325g/500g= 65%
  • 5g Active Dry Yeast – 5g/500g = 1%
  • 10g Salt – 10g/500g = 2%
  • 25g Olive Olive Oil – 25g/500g = 5%
  • 20g Honey or Sugar – 20g/500g = 4%

An important note: In baker’s math, the total does NOT = 100%; rather, the flour alone=100%.

In this recipe, the sum of all percentages = 177%.

With the baker’s percentage formula in hand, it is now easier to adjust your recipe for a pizza party with ten friends or an intimate evening at home.

First, to know how much dough to make for the day, you need to know how much dough you need per pie and, thus, dough ball weight. And the weight of your pizza doughball weight depends on the style of pizza you want to make.

Pizza Pun


How does a Millennial weigh their doughballs?

In Instagrams

How Do Various Pizza Crust Styles Vary in Thickness?

There is no absolute standard for thickness among the various crust styles, given that every pizza maker has its unique recipe.

However, we all probably can agree that the NY-style pizza is a very thin crust pizza, and Chicago and Sicilian styles are quite thick. Neapolitan pizza is on the thin side and tends to be slightly thicker than New York style.

As a standard measure, thin-crust pizzas are about 1/8” and thick crust pizzas are about ¼” thick.

A thick crust is about 25% more dough than a thin crust and a pan pizza is about 50% times more than the dough weight of a thin crust.

Of course, other variables define the two styles, but we’re talking crust thickness here. The typical pan pizza is almost as thick as a Chicago-style deep-dish pizza (which is extraordinarily thick and more like a pie). Both are cooked in a pan or cast-iron skillet with approximately one-inch sides and a generous oil amount.

To achieve a very thin New York-style crust, the dough is typically stretched or rolled with a rolling pin to 1/8 inch (3 mm), pinched with a dough docker then quickly topped and baked.

Neapolitan pizza dough uses a bit more dough, resulting in a slightly thicker crust.

Sicilian-style pan pizza starts with about 1/4-inch-thick dough patted or stretched to fill the pan. It is then allowed to rise a bit in the pan before baking to achieve that thick crust. 

For more on crust thickness, you can check our article Wondering How Thick You Should Stretch Your Dough? Find Out!

What is the Pizza Dough Weight to Achieve my Desired Pizza Style?

It goes without saying that the bigger the pie, the more dough you need to maintain the desired crust thickness. Also, the thicker the crust you want, the more dough you need. But how much more?

In order to calculate the amount of dough that you need, there is some math involved.  We need to find the surface area of the desired pizza. To do calculate the surface area you need to use the following formula:

p x R2  Where P = 3.14 and R = radius of the desired pizza size.

Using the numbers from our recipe, we found that 885 grams of dough are good to make four 12″ pizzas (Thin Crust).  So we take 885g / 4 = 221.25g.

To calculate the surface area of the 12″ pizza would be 3.14 x 36 = 113.04.

To determine the area per square inch would be 221.25 / 113.04sq in = 1.95 per sq in.

Other Pizza Doughball Weight and Sizes Calculations

To calculate for other pizza sizes you would need to calculate as follows:

  • 10” Pizza would be 3.14 x 25 = 78.5 x 1.95g/sq in = 153.07g

  • 12” Pizza would be 3.14 x 36 = 113.04 x 1.95/sq in = 220.42g

  • 14” Pizza would be 3.14 x 49 = 153.86 x 1.95/sq in = 300.02g

  • 16” Pizza would be 3.14 x 64= 200.96 x 1.95/sq in = 391.87g

If you would like a thick crust just multiply any of the above results by 1.25 or 25% of your result.

To make things easy for the home baker who wants to know the pizza doughball weight, we did the math and rounded it up to the nearest and easy-to-remember number, in-home baking 1 or 2 grams of dough will not make a palpable difference.

Use the chart below to figure out the pizza doughball weight you’ll need for a given size (diameter) and pizza crust style.

Pizza Dough Weight Chart

Doughball Weights per Pizza Style

If you are starting out or would like to experiment with pizza doughball weights, the middle point is always a good place to start because you can either deduct or add more dough according to your preference. Accordingly, you can start with the following weights: 

Pizza Dough Weight Chart


Pizza SizeNY Style PizzaNeapolitan PizzaPan Pizza
10″150g190g230g
12″220g275g330g
14″300g375g450g
16″390g490g585g

Specific Pizza Dough Weight by Size

How much does a doughball for a 10″ pizza weigh?

For a 10″ pizza you will need 190 grams of dough.

How much does a doughball for a 12″ pizza weigh?

For a 12″ pizza you will need 275 grams of dough.

How much does a doughball for a 14″ pizza weigh?

For a 14″ pizza you will need 375 grams of dough.

How much does a doughball for a 16″ pizza weigh?

For a 16″ pizza you will need 490 grams of dough.

What Size Doughball Makes What Size Crust (Ounces)

For those of you who use ounces instead of grams, here’s a quick reference:

Pizza Dough Weight Chart in Ounces

Pizza Doughball Weight (Size)Thick CrustHand-TossedThin Crust
9 oz8 inch10 inch12 inch
14 oz10 inch12 inch14 inch
16 oz12 inch14 inch16 inch
19 oz13 inch15 inch17 inch
23 oz14 inch16 inch18 inch
26 oz16 inch18 inch20 inch

If you don’t want to go by inches, here’s a quick reference by common size:

Pizza Dough Weight – FAQs

How much does a small pizza dough ball weigh?

For a small pizza, you will need 9 ounces of dough.

How much does a medium pizza dough ball weigh?

For a medium pizza, you will need 16 ounces of dough.

How much does a large pizza dough ball weigh?

For a large pizza, you will need 23 ounces of dough.

Pizza Dough Weight – Additional Tips

It is important to note that when you calculate the pizza doughball weight they are at room temperature, a frozen dough ball will weigh more as the water from condensation freezes.

You may be surprised to find that a 14-inch pizza requires about twice the dough as a 10-inch pizza; this is the power of pi and pie!

If you’re not that into math, don’t worry; just follow the chart or the recommended weights to determine what dough ball weight you need to achieve the crust size you like.

Our standard recipe (above) makes 885 grams of dough perfect for four 12-inch New York-style crusts or three 14-inch crusts.

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How Can I Adjust the Recipe to Make More or Less Dough?

If you want to make other pizza styles or more doughballs, you may need to adjust the amount of dough you make on a given day.

In that case, use our finished dough calculator to determine the weight of each ingredient you need.

For example, you want to make four 12-inch Neapolitan pizzas. Looking at the chart above, you see that 275g of dough is needed per pie, for a total of 1100g of dough. At 885g total, the standard recipe is not enough to make the four dough balls you want.

In theory, you could double it, but that is a lot of dough, and your mixer might not be able to handle it. A better way is to use the baker’s percentages of your recipe and the finished dough calculator.

Go to the calculator, then enter the baker’s percentage for each ingredient and the total dough weight you need (1100g). The calculator will tell you how many grams of each ingredient you need- no more math required!

The Last Slice

We hope that we’ve now provided a simple way for you to find your pizza dough weight chart, so you can start making pizza right away.

We challenge you to try different weights and test the results to find which doughball weight works the best for you!

If you have any questions, please check our additional resources below or contact us, we’ll be more than glad to help out.

Additional Resources

homemade pizza dough calculator

Homemade Pizza Dough Calculator

Try our homemade pizza dough calculator. Start by choosing the pizza style you want to bake insert the desired baker’s percentages and download your FREE recipe.

Homemade Pizza FAQs

How to Start Making Pizza?


Making pizza at home is actually very simple and anyone can do it.  If you don’t have a mixer you can still make the dough by hand.

Check our guide on How to Get Started to begin your pizza-making journey.

Do I need a pizza oven to make pizza at home?


No, you can make pizza in a regular kitchen oven, and these days you can even make pizza on your stove or your grill. 

Check our Recommended Oven Section to find the oven that best suits your needs.

What is the best flour for pizza?


The best flour for pizza is flour that contains a high-protein content.  Of course, it will depend on the kind of oven you have.

In terms of the brand, we’ve found that Caputo Chef’s Flour works best for home ovens while Caputo Pizzeria works best for high-temperature ovens. 

To learn more about flour and why we think Caputo is best check the Best Flour for Pizza article.

How long should I bake pizza?


The time to cook your pizza will depend on the kind of pizza you are making and the kind of oven you have. 

The lower the temperature the longer will take to cook your pizza.  On average it will take 12 to 15 min to cook pizza in a 500F oven. 

For details on specific cooking times and temperatures check the Guide to Oven Temperature and Cooking Time article.

What kind of yeast should I use for pizza?


To make pizza dough you can use any yeast you have available.  You can use fresh, instant, or active dry yeast. 

The amount of yeast to use will vary depending on which one you use. 

We found that active dry yeast gives the best results, to find out why we think is best to check Yeast: Here is What You Need to Know article.

What is the best hydration percentage?


On average water should be 65% of the total weight of flour.  For example, if your recipe calls for 500g of flour, you should add 325g of water (500 x .65 = 325).

Of course, the temperature of the oven will also have an impact on your final result. 

Check our guidelines our Baker’s Percentage Charts for the best results.

For more pizza questions, check our Pizza FAQs Page or Contact Us.​

When in Doubt, Check Our Resources

To help you become a better homemade pizza baker we developed these reference sources that you can use when making any of our recipes.

Conversion Charts

Find our conversion charts for volume, weight, length, and temperature.

Pizza Guides

Check our guides on products and everything related to homemade pizza.

Pizza Calculators

Make your own recipes with our pizza calculators. Let us do the numbers!

Pizza Glossary

Hundreds of pizza words. If we don’t have it, send it to us and we’ll publish it.

Enjoy!

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